Eden Park Illumination Awarded Additional $1 Million Grant to Commercialize New Microplasma Ultraviolet Water Purification & Sterilization Technology from the US Department of Energy

The US DOE SBIR Phase II Sequential Grant was awarded to Eden Park Illumination as a follow-up to a Phase II grant successfully completed in 2015. The company is now engaging industry partner companies as it looks to broadly commercialize the technology.

Champaign, IL, USA, July 28th, 2015: Eden Park Illumination has been awarded a Sequential Grant in the amount of $1 million from the US DOE to commercialize microplasma Ultraviolet lighting tiles for water purification and sterilization. The sequential grant immediately follows the Phase II grant which Eden Park Illumination (EPI) successfully completed in March of this year. Eden Park will continue the development of low temperature microplasma/microcavity UV flat lamps (in the range of UVB – UVC) having areas up to one square foot for water purification and disinfection.

The grant’s principle investigator, Dr. Cy Herring, President of Eden Park Illumination, commented, “Due to previous technology investments the DOE has made in EPI, we have proven the efficiency of the microplasma / microcavity technology at wavelengths to effectively purify and disinfect water in new and exciting ways. This sequential grant award will provide EPI with funding to further improve the mercury-free, UV microplasma technology and bring new, cost effective planar solutions to this large and growing market”.

The objective of the grant is to effectively commercialize the thin, flat, mercury-free microplasma UV lighting systems which were developed and demonstrated in the Phase II award. The Phase II grant produced microplasma / microcavity arrays having a radiating area up to one square foot (900 cm2) at UV conversion efficiency greater than 20%. The Sequential grant will lead to a scaled production process and an optimized power delivery system for each size class of microplasma lamps.

The Advantages of Microplasma UV Technology

This new UV water disinfection technology offers many advantages over conventional mercury-based UV light sources. Microplasma lamps have a more adaptive planar form factor and produce no negative impact of mercury on the environment. The thin planar form of the microplasma lamps produces very uniform UV output across the lamp face and the microplasma lamps have a longer effective life span compared to conventional mercury-based UV lamps. Unlike mercury-based lamps, neither the output nor the life of the microplasma lamp is impacted by temperature or on/off cycles. The microplasma lamps also provide the advantage of instant on & off operation.

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Eden Park Illumination Awarded $1 Million Grant to Commercialize New Microplasma Ultra-violet Water Disinfection Technology from the US Department of Energy

The US DOE SBIR Phase II Grant was awarded to Eden Park Illumination as a follow-up to a Phase I grant successfully completed in 2012. The company is now engaging industry partner companies as it looks to broadly commercialize the technology.

Champaign, IL, USA, March 26th, 2013: Eden Park Illumination has been awarded a $1 million grant from the US DOE to commercialize microplasma Ultra-violet lighting tiles for water purification and sterilization. Eden Park will develop and demonstrate large scale microplasma/microcavity UV flat lamps (in the range of UVB – UVC) having areas up to one square foot for water purification and disinfection.

Eden Park Illumination - UV Microplasma Lamp Engine

Eden Park Illumination – UV Microplasma Lamp Engine

The grant’s principle investigator, Dr. Sung-Jin Park, one of the Founders of Eden Park Illumination, commented, “This grant provides the resources to optimize UV microplasma technology in such a way to make it commercially viable. This technology will bring a range of new products to the water industry that will provide mercury free, energy efficient, low maintenance and very cost effective operation that can augment or replace conventional mercury-based UV technologies.”

The grants objective will be to demonstrate large scale products for thin microplasma UV flat lighting systems having a radiating area up to one square foot (900 cm2) at a UV conversion efficiency greater than 20%. A scaled production methodology will be put in place and an optimized power delivering system will be designed and developed according to the scale of each size class of microplasma lamps. Also, lamps with other emitters (molecular gas emitters or UV conversion phosphors) capable of generating photons in various UV wavelength ranges (172 – 310 nm) will be developed to provide a broad range of UV applications for water treatment.

The Advantages of Microplasma UV Technology
This new UV water disinfection technology offers many advantages over conventional mercury-based UV light sources. Microplasma lamps have a more adaptive planar form factor and produce no negative impact of mercury on the environment. Conventional UV lamps also have a short working life span defined in hundreds to thousands of hours as compared to tens of thousands of hours for UV microplasma lamps. Current mercury based cylindrical shaped lamps are not conducive to the uniform treatment of water in compact (small volume) installations. Conventional UV lamps are also susceptible to temperature variations, and above (or below) the optimum temperature range the UV output is reduced. Microplasma UV technology is not sensitive to temperature variation.